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Integrated Community Energy Solutions

Examples

Leading communities across Canada and around the world are building experience with Integrated Community Energy Solutions (ICES). Through integration across two or three sectors, project champions and their partners are demonstrating and proving the value of new technology and new ways to use existing technology. They are also identifying barriers that need to be addressed in order for ICES to become wide-spread.

The following examples provide a glimpse of the ICES that are beginning to appear across Canada:

Drake Landing Solar Community, in Okotoks, Alberta features 52 highly-efficient R-2000 homes connected to a solar district heating system. By storing the heat from the summer sun in the ground and extracting it in the cooler months, over 90 percent of the community's space-heating needs are met by renewable solar energy – a first in the world.

The City of Guelph, Ontario is implementing the comprehensive, city-wide community energy plan that was developed in partnership with businesses and organizations across the city. A dedicated community energy manager is employed by the city to support innovative projects. One such project is an electricity generating station that is powered by the methane produced at the local landfill.

Dockside Green, in Victoria, British Columbia is a large harbourfront redevelopment project near the centre of the city. This high-density neighbourhood features a mix of residential, commercial and industrial applications, a district heating system that uses waste wood, and an innovative water management system that involves on-site treatment of waste water for use in landscape irrigation and toilet flushing. It is on track to be greenhouse gas neutral for all the building energy use, which would be a first for North America.

The Sawmill Waste-to-Electricity Project, in Middle Musquodoboit, Nova Scotia is located within a sawmill plant. By using biomass waste from its operations as fuel, the facility is able to meet most of its electrical and heat needs. Any surplus energy is sold to a local utility company and used by the surrounding community.